Social Studies 16-17
 

Social Studies Courses

 

Advanced Debate I & II

These courses are available to students who have successfully completed Tournament Debate and have competed on the intermediate debate level. Students enrolled will be debating on the advanced level in school and at the Long Island Forensic League Competitions.

Prerequisite(s):

Tournament Debate II

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement Art History

This course is designed to provide the same benefits as those provided by an introductory college course in art history. In the course, students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the ancient world to the present and from a variety of cultures. They will learn to observe and analyze works of art within their historical context, to articulate what they see or experience, and to frame an understanding that relates how and why works of art communicate visual meaning.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11,12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement Economics

This ONE YEAR course of study will prepare students for both the macro and the micro economics exams administered by the College Board in May. The basic themes essential to all economics courses (scarcity, opportunity costs, the structure of the U.S. economy, demand, supply and market equilibrium, the price system and market elasticity) are followed by an examination of micro economics (consumers and firms, market imperfections, the role of government, and current micro economic issues including public finance, taxation and labor markets). The third component of the course focuses on macroeconomic theory (measuring national output and income, unemployment, inflation and growth; discussing aggregate expenditure and equilibrium output monetary and fiscal policy as well as aggregate demand and aggregate supply, stabilization, the labor market and inflation). Each Advanced Placement exam is administered in a two, rather than the traditional three, hour time period. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exams. Course meets state graduation requirement in economics.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement European History

Students examine the major themes of European history. Through an exploration of primary and secondary materials, the students study European history from the Late Medieval Period through current times. They will be challenged to analyze, interpret and evaluate the sources, to assess the complexities of issues and to discover how historians reach conclusions about the past. Students must take the Advanced Placement Examination in May and, following the AP exam, they study additional units and prepare for the Global History Regents.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement Government & Politics

This introductory college course is intended to answer the question posed by every political science student: Who (really) governs and to what end? Through the examination of competing theories of political power and through the analysis of competing interests (majoritarian politics, interest-group pressures, etc.), the process by which public policy is established is studied.A variety of contemporary issues including immigration policy, gun control, civil liberties, education policy, health care, campaign finance and national security in a post-September 11th world provide the lens through which the workings of contemporary American political institutions are examined. Taking the College Board examination is a requirement for course credit. * Meets Government graduation requirement.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11, 12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement Psychology

The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. Students should expect nightly readings in our college-level text and occasional questions which are designed to promote thought and class discussions. There are regular supplemental readings and discussions from journals, magazines current events, and even popular culture, and creative research projects on topics that are of interest to students. There are single- and multi-chapter tests and take home essays from previous College Board exams. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11, 12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Advanced Placement US History

The Advanced Placement Course in American History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in American History. The course prepares students for college by establishing high expectations and challenges equivalent to those of a full-year introductory college course. Students learn to assess historical materials - their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance and to weigh the evidence and the interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students must take the Advanced Placement Examination and, following the AP exam, they study additional units and prepare for the United States History and Government Regents

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11, 12

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Economics

This one semester course introduces students to the workings of the American economic system through the use of current and historic newspaper articles. It will emphasize how economic decisions are made and how they affect our daily lives. Topics will include supply and demand, the business community, consumer activities, the role of government, and international trade.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Economic Ideas and Issues: Project Advance Syracuse University (C)

This one semester course begins with a presentation of the scientific method and model building which is then used to analyze the question: How do individuals and societies make choices when they are faced with scarcity? Beginning with the individual in the simplest of situations, a one-person society, the course moves step by step to develop a model of a complex society based on division of labor and exchange through markets. The process takes students from the microeconomic to the macroeconomic level, emphasizing the connection between these two perspectives. Students examine the benefits, as well as the problems, inherent in a market-oriented economy. The course prepares students to analyze and understand the ongoing economic policy debate between interventionists and non-interventionists.

 

Tuition fee required to be enrolled in the course. Upon successful completion of this course, students may earn three college credits.

 

Prerequisites:      None

Grades:              12

Credit:               0.5

Meets:               5 periods weekly

 

Exploring Childhood I (with Lab)

Students study child development and work with young children on a regular basis; thus, they develop a competence for working with young children and framework for understanding the forces that shape the development of a child. They also gain a sense of their own identity, a better understanding of their own identity, and a better understanding of their families.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

1

Meets:

7.5 periods weekly

 

Exploring Childhood II  (Not offered in 2015-2016)

Students who have successfully completed Exploring Childhood I and who select this course as a senior will continue with their on-site experience working with young children. They may also fulfill their Participation in Government requirement by researching, writing and presenting a paper on a public policy issue that affects childhood development. This must be done with the approval of the teacher.

Prerequisite(s):

Exploring Childhood I

Grade(s):

101112

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Facing History & Ourselves

In the words of Albert Einstein, “the world is a dangerous place to live. Not because of the people who are evil; but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.” This course provides students the opportunity to examine the choices individuals and governments make which often lead to human rights violations and in extreme cases, genocide. The Holocaust provides the historic background for the course. The Nazi "final solution" is examined as well as the social and political milieu in which the Nazi Party came to power. The course examines the means by which the Nazis manipulated stereotypes, legalized discrimination and segregation to remove and eliminate those it deemed less than human. At its heart, this is a course about history AND human behavior. It requires students to look at themselves and the decisions ordinary people make that impact others and history. The related concepts of individual identity, conformity, obedience, mass psychology, bystander behavior, participation and resistance are incorporated throughout. An essential part of the class looks at the history of racism and discrimination in this country over the past century. Additional topics include the Eugenics Movement, the Armenian Genocide, The Rape of Nanking, the Cambodian and Rwandan Genocides and the moral responsibility of governments in the face of such tragedies. An underlying assumption of the course is that the preservation of human rights and the very survival of democracy, rest on individuals being willing to participate, even in the smallest ways.

*Meets Requirement for Participation in Government.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly



Global History I

Grade 9 begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact and continues to a period of Global Interactions from approximately 1400 to 1750. The course emphasizes the key themes of interactions over time, shifts in political power, and the role of belief systems.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

9

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Global History II

The second year of the two year Global History sequence culminates in the Global History Regents in June of the sophomore year. The Enlightenment and the global developments that emanated from the French Revolution begin this year-long examination of our modern world. The world-wide Age of Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the expansion of Europe overseas with its concomitant nationalist reactions and the violent termination of empires, dynasties and tyrannies in Asia, Europe and Latin America permit students to study the effects economic dislocations, racism, political extremism and totalitarianism have had on political and social institutions. The course challenges students to consider varying viewpoints, to analyze, interpret and evaluate primary sources and to integrate economic geography as a causal factor in our study of the past.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will introduce philosophy as an essential human activity. It will focus on processes used by philosophers as they have examined fundamental questions like: What is reason? How can we know what is true? How do we know right from wrong? What is the relationship among self, mind and body? What is beautiful? What is the purpose of government? This course will include the study of major social thinkers of the Western world. Some Eastern works will also be addressed. In addition to traditional classroom activities, the seminar method will be used. Therefore, oral participation skills will be taught and class participation will be required. Challenging reading and written analysis will also be expected. By taking this course students should expect that their reading, reasoning and writing skills will improve.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Introduction to Research 9

Introduction to Research seeks to accomplish two objectives. One objective is to provide 9th graders with a sense of what it means to participate in the high school research program that begins in the 10th grade in either science or social science. The second objective is to teach 9th graders the basic skills in research and presentation, both written and oral, which are fundamental to academic success in high school, college and beyond. Those skills include: 1. How to evaluate the validity of websites. 2. How to utilize the High School Library's electronic databases. 3. How to build a bibliography. 4. How to write a science or social science research paper. 5. How to make an effective oral presentation. 6. How to use a spreadsheet program to create charts and graphs.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

9

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Project Citizen – The Power of the People (Formerly Participation in Government)

Project Citizen is meant to promote interest and understanding of our state, local, and federal government. The goal of the course is to actively engage students in learning how to evaluate and influence public policy on a variety of governmental levels. The course will begin with an analysis of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States (including the Bill of Rights) and several other landmark documents that have shaped our nation's political culture. Throughout the course students will debate foreign, domestic and economic policy. Project Citizen, an inquiry-based course of study, will culminate in a student driven - public policy project that will be presented to a panel of their peers.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Social Science Research 10

The major research project in SSR I is an entry into the Long Island History Day competition. Students are provided a theme about which to develop a project. Research is based on both primary & secondary source materials, with the best projects using a preponderance of primary source materials. Students can work individually or as part of a team. Students may present their work in the form of a formal research paper, an exhibit, a website, a documentary, or a performance. Winners are invited to participate in the NY State History Day competition in Cooperstown. Winners at the state level are invited to participate in the National History Day competition at the University of Maryland. This course also provides students with a broad-based introduction to doing research in the social sciences.

Prerequisite(s):

Intro to Research 9 or departmental permission

Grade(s):

10

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Social Science Research 11

Students begin the process of developing a project in one of the social sciences for entry into the Intel National Science Talent Search competition. The process begins with the writing of a formal review of the literature related to the student's area of interest and continues with the development of a research proposal. Students will develop a hypothesis and design a test of that hypothesis. Students will learn advanced techniques of data analysis utilizing the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). At the conclusion of the course students are ready to begin the process of data collection.

Prerequisite(s):

Social Science Research 10

Grade(s):

11

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Social Science Research 12

Students continue their Intel research by collecting and analyzing data. The project concludes with the writing of a formal research report for entry into the national competition. Students will also develop an oral presentation about their project. The semester also includes analysis of the Jericho High School General Social Survey as well as other in-house research projects.

Prerequisite(s):

Social Science Research 11

Grade(s):

12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

Sociology of Institutions (C)

Sociology is the study of social forces. Social forces put pressure on all of us to think, act and feel in socially acceptable ways.This course will introduce students to the sociological perspective through an examination of basic sociological concepts and theories. The sociological perspective will be applied to the study of a wide range of social issues in contemporary America. Key social issues associated with the economy, politics, family,religion, education and, healthcare will beexamined in detail.

 

In addition to learning about contemporary American society through the lens of sociology, students will also learn how to conduct college level research and present their findings in both written and oral formats. Skills which are essential to success in college.

This course may be taken for college credit through St. John's University.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Tournament Debate I

Students learn philosophy, rhetoric and study and practice debating strategies and techniques. Current events and controversial issues are analyzed and debated. Novice debaters will hone skills, such as critical listening, research and public speaking. We will discuss current events and the historical components necessary to participate in Lincoln-Douglas and Public Forum Debates. Students are encouraged to debate with students from other schools at the Long Island Forensic Association's competitions. Students also have the opportunity to participate in local and state debate competitions.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

9, 10, 11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

Tournament Debate II

Students will prepare for intermediate competitions with an emphasis on philosophy and archetypal values of democracy and liberty. We will expand upon the skills and topics taught in the novice course. Students are encouraged to debate with students from other schools, at Long Island Forensic Association competitions. Students have the opportunity to participate in local and state debate competitions.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

10, 11, 12

Credit:

0.5

Meets:

5 periods weekly

 

United States History and Government

Beginning with a survey of United States history and intellectual forces from 1607-1865, this course proceeds through five units focused on the United States since 1865. They are: the Industrialization of the United States; At Home and Abroad: Prosperity, Depression and War, 1917-1940; United States in an Age of Global Crisis: Responsibility and Cooperation; A World in Uncertain Times: 1950-Present; and, Looking Backward. Throughout the course enduring constitutional issues will be studied. They include: National Power limits and Potentials: Federalism - the Balance between Nation and State; The Judiciary - Interpreter of the Constitution or Shaper of Public Policy; Civil Liberties - the Balance between the Government and the Individual; Criminal Liberties - Rights of the Accused and Protection of the Community; Equality - its Definition as Constitutional Value; The Rights of Women Under the Constitution; The Rights of Ethnic and Racial Groups under the Constitution; Presidential Power in Wartime and in Foreign Affairs; The Separation of Powers and the Capacity to Govern; Avenues of Representation; Property Rights and Change and Flexibility. At the end of the course students must take the United States History and Government Regents.

Prerequisite(s):

None

Grade(s):

11

Credit:

1

Meets:

5 periods weekly